Christine “Chris” Walker Partin

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Christine “Chris” Walker Partin, 66, of Bossier City, and a native of LaSalle Parish, passed from this life on Thursday, March 20, 2014, at home with her husband at her side. As her husband – Col. Charles N. Partin, Sr. – noted, the elegant and gracious Steel Magnolia did it her way – even in death. Almost four months prior to her death, Chris wrote her own obituary, which follows: I, Christine Walker Partin of Bossier City, Louisiana, have lived a long and wonderful life. Now on this 6th day of December 2013, I am writing my own obituary, because there are some things I want said that might be missed otherwise. Due to stage 4 Pancreatic cancer, inoperable, no possible radiation, and no chemotherapy (my choice), I have a luxury not afforded everyone. That being time to reflect, analyze, and examine the really  important things that have taken place in their lives. The time left to me is being used to do just that. The expert support of St. Joseph’s Hospice, and their magic pain medication provides a comfortable existence with a gratefully  clear headed thought process. My resulting thoughts are expressed in this obituary. I was born October 26, 1947, the fourth and youngest child of Reverend Genie and Margie Collins Walker. Both parents were from Jena, LA. My father was a Baptist minister, and my mother was a doting protector of me, her youngest. She spoiled me,and I loved it. They both preceeded me in death as did two brothers and a sister. My older  brother, Dalton, died an accidental death. My other brother, Norman Walker and sister,
Margie Gail Beach Aycock both died of cancer. Both were life-long smokers, and really never stopped. I quit in 2000 after 40 years of smoking, but the damage was done. I understand Pancreatic cancer has a genetic  propensity of 20 percent, with 80 percent being attributed to life style. If the inclusion of this terrible statistic keeps one person ... especially my beloved Grandchildren from smoking, it will have been worth the pain of writing it.
I have had a long and virtually illness free life. God makes no mistakes, nor does nature. There is no luck or coincidence  in our lives. It is all according to God’s plan and the choices we make. Let me be clear, I do not fear death only because of my faith in Salvation in the afterlife. My only regret is that my life’s abrupt termination, probably caused by my own choices,  will keep me from the full enjoyment of my children, step-children, and  wonderful Grandchildren. My sons, Greg and Darrell Kirkland, have given me Grandchildren that are ... well, perfect. The father of Greg and Darrell is John H. Kirkland, a good man. My  step-sons, Mark, Chuck, and
Scott Partin have contributed mightily to my pool of perfect Grandchildren. Five sons and thirteen Grandchildren, what more can a grandmother ask  for. During these unusual and uneasy days a peaceful calm has been created by my close friends and family. The advice, counsel, and care of three RNs in the immediate family has removed most of the mystery from my ordeal. Janet Partin,  sister-in-law, Eue Partin, daughter-in-law, and Daniel
Raynes, the youngest of the medical threesome, have been so informative and supportive. My sister’s daughter, Gina Layfield, and I were the caregivers for her mother through her final days of the same diagnosis I have. Now, Gina is with me as a committed caregiver, along with my devoted husband. She has always been the daughter I neverhad. Gina, I thank you for the tender and wonderful care you have given so freely. The support you have given my husband is not unnoticed by either of us. You have made his life much more bearable as well as mine. I can not thank you enough. It is my well thought out decision to not have a funeral, graveside service, or memorial. I will not ask people to attend a function for me that I will not be attending. My feelings are very strong and final concerning this matter. I have donated my body to cancer research, followed by cremation. Arrangements have already been made. My ashes are to be returned to my husband who has been given personal instructions by me concerning their private disposition. Now, having said almost all I wanted to say, I will end
my obituary by telling you my marriage to Col. Charles M.  Partin, Sr., is the best single thing I have ever done. Our 20 years together have been the most productive, fulfilling, and happiest time of my life. We are both strong Christians, of a like mind and the same faith. If you are blessed enough to find the perfect partner for all facets of your life ... you will know it. I found that in Charlie, the most honorable man I ever knew. Thank you, my dearest husband for absolutely everything. We will be together again   
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