If we erase our history, who are we?

Obituaries

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Purvis “Earl” Cotten, 83, passed from this life on Monday, September 3, 2018, while surrounded by

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Sharel Renee Miller, 63, of Georgetown, passed from this life on Thursday, September 6, 2018 in W

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Edith Ann McDaniel Price, 80, of Winnfield, passed away Friday, September 7, 2018 at her home aft

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Steven Joshua Webb, 31, of Monroe, passed from this life on Monday, August 13, 2018.

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Russell William McClary, 68, of Olla, passed from this life on Friday, August 31, 2018, at Hardtn

By Pat Buchanan

When the Dodge Charger of 20-year-old Nazi sympathizer James Alex Fields Jr., plunged into that crowd of protesters Saturday, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer, Fields put Charlottesville on the map of modernity alongside Ferguson.

Before Fields ran down the protesters, and then backed up, running down more, what was happening seemed but a bloody brawl between extremists on both sides of the issue of whether Robert E. Lee’s statue should be removed from Emancipation Park, formerly Lee Park. With Heyer’s death, the brawl was elevated to a moral issue. And President Donald Trump’s initial failure to denounce the neo-Nazi and Klan presence was declared a moral failure.

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