Columns/Opinions

Wed
03
Jun

Robert Knight: Taking liberties with Falwell, Trump

Did you hear the good news?

Liberty University, which the media predicted would be Ground Zero for a deadly outbreak of coronavirus, has not reported a single on-campus case. Not one.

This is welcome news to any person of goodwill. But not to the press.

In March, the media went bat crazy, essentially accusing Liberty President Jerry Falwell, Jr. of risking mass murder by welcoming some students back from spring break.

The New York Times headline on March 29 was “Liberty University Brings Back Its Students, and Coronavirus, Too.”

 

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Wed
03
Jun

I was humbled by your actions

I was humbled by your actions

I really don’t know where to begin, other than to say thanks to everyone who had a hand in surprising me on my 80th birthday. I was very humbled and appreciate your efforts, although I’m not sure I deserve such attention.

I know over the past few years, several of my children have approached the former and present mayor of Jena about having a special day for me. Each time when the mayor asked me, I said “no”. Apparently there is a part of “no” that Mayor LaDawn Edwards didn’t understand.

With the underhanded help of my wife Bonita, other family members and others, the Mayor was able to pull the event off – and completely surprised me. I never suspected what was about to happen on that Friday prior to my Sunday birthday.

 

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Wed
27
May

Derek Hunter: Garbage in, garbage out

The only way to learn anything from an experience is to have accurate information about it when you’re through it. It’s called “learning from your mistakes.” People do it all the time. It’s how we get better as human beings. Thomas Edison reportedly said, “I didn’t fail. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work,” about creating the lightbulb. Politicians, on the other hand, are incapable, or at least unwilling, of learning from the mistakes they’re making because they believe they’re benefiting from the disinformation. And we’re all going to suffer because of it.

How many people have died from COVID-19? You can cite the official numbers, which vary depending on your source. They’re horrific, of course, but are they anywhere close to accurate?

Dr. Anthony Fauci testified this week that the number is probably higher, Dr. Deborah Birx, it was reported last week, thinks the number may be inflated by as much as 25 percent. Who is right? We don’t know.

Wed
27
May

Bill Murchison: Ain’t we ‘deplorables’ deplorable?

So. A Texas day care center can open now. I said “right now.” Come Friday, May 22, Texas bars and bowling alleys, by gubernatorial writ, are allowed to pry their doors partly -- and, yes, cautiously -- open.

On the same day, and under the same dispensation, Texas restaurant owners can beckon inside their premises a larger contingent of customers: up to 50% capacity. By the end of the month, Texas sports camps have gubernatorial permission to resume operations -- c-a-a-a-a-r-r-r-efully -- to see how things go. No Texan is obligated to take advantage of these opportunities. They’re there if you want them.

Wed
27
May

Civil War: How do civil wars happen?

Civil War: How do civil wars happen?

My old newspaper friend, W. B. “Bert” Hatten of West Monroe, sent me the following article, saying, “this is a fascinating (and scary) read. It’s one of the best nutshell descriptions of our current political situation that I’ve seen.

The article was written by Dr. Jack Devere Minzey, born Oct. 6, 1928 and died April 8, 2018. He was the Department Head of Education at Eastern Michigan University as well as a prolific author of numerous books, most of which were on the topic of education and the government role therein. This article was the last of his works.

By Dr. Jack Devere Minzey

Wed
20
May

Gavin Wax: A new day in a fearful America

It’s a new day in America, that much is guaranteed. By now you’ve been told repeatedly how we’re living in a time like no other. Schools are empty, roads throughout most of our communities are quieter than normal, and the facemask fashion trends were certainly an unexpected twist to this year’s summer wardrobe. It is certainly a new day, but few would say things are better.

Wed
20
May

Not as bad as the Great Depression

Not as bad as the Great Depression

I have heard some say that the current condition in the United States compares to the Great Depression of the 1930s. I was speaking with Hilda Husbands the other day, and neither of us thinks things are as bad as we remember during the Great Depression.

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across the world; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s.

It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. The Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the global economy can decline.

 

 

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Wed
13
May

Greatest mistake in history

The idea that the worldwide lockdown of virtually every country other than Sweden may have been an enormous mistake strikes many -- including world leaders; most scientists, especially health officials, doctors and epidemiologists; those who work in major news media; opinion writers in those media; and the hundreds of millions, if not billions, of people who put their faith in these people -- as so preposterous as to be immoral. Timothy Egan of The New York Times described Republicans who wish to enable their states to open up as “the party of death.”

That’s the way it is today on planet Earth, where deceit, cowardice and immaturity now dominate almost all societies because the elites are deceitful, cowardly and immature.

Wed
13
May

USA post-pandemic ten commandments

USA post-pandemic ten commandments

In an effort to capitalize on the lessons learned from the current pandemic, the plain folk of America are beginning to demonstrate and demand change. They’re tired of politicians and experts locked in inaction, according to Terry Paulson, a columnist for Townhall Daily.

Their changes might be summarized in 10 new and compelling commandments to guide America’s future. There’s been no mountain top conclave to confirm one direction, but their collective voice might just provide plain spoken guidance for our future.

Here are 10 post pandemic commandments they just might rally behind to make America great again:

1. Life is difficult, unsafe, and has always carried risk. None of us get out of this alive. So, never again even think of sacrificing the economic, mental, and physical well-being of the 99.7 percent to possibly protect and save the .3 percent from any disease or disaster.

Wed
06
May

Josh Hammer: Will there be another great awakening?

Josh Hammer: Will there be another great awakening?

The coronavirus pandemic and its fallout will usher in countless trends. The neoliberal consensus, already battered since the transformative populist 2016 phenomena of Brexit and Donald Trump’s presidential election, will come under even greater scrutiny as we navigate the deepest global recession since the Great Depression.

Nations the world over will grow more skeptical of the Davos class’s peddling of free trade and free travel as unalloyed goods, preferring instead the comparative safety of self-sufficient critical supply chains and secure borders. Overall, the New World Order of President George H.W. Bush may have finally met its demise in Wuhan, China.

 

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