Columns/Opinions

Obituaries

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Robert “T-Bob” Cassels, Jr., 78, of the Rosefield Community, passed from this life on Sunday, Sep

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Chuckey Marvin Foley, 57, of Orlando, Florida and a native of Jena, LA, passed away to be with th

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Shirley Beth Hatten, 77, of Jena, passed from this life on Friday, September 14, 2018, at the LaS

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Mary Parker Valentine Taylor, 94, of the Belah Community near Jena, passed from this life on Wedn

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Burnis L.

Fri
25
May

We all need to sit on the front porch

By Sammy J. Fraklin

My friend and fellow columnist, Randy Rogers, shares a column with me from time to time. We have printed several in past issues of this newspaper. Randy grew up in a rural North Louisiana parish and his childhood was much like mine.

Last week, Randy sent me a column about, “This Old Porch”, and included a poem about the old front porch.

The column set me to thinking about the front porches in my early life. We never lived in a house that didn’t have a front porch. Many a problem was solved on the front porch, and a lot of visiting took place there, as well.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://www.etypeservices.com/Jena%20TimesID339/

Fri
25
May

Make Congress work again

By Sen. David Perdue

Editor’s Note: This column was co-authored by Jenny Beth Martin.

***

“I say to Congress: I will never sign another bill like this again.”

President Trump made this crystal clear following the massive, last-minute funding bill in March, and he is serious. However, Congress has not gotten the message.

Several weeks have passed since the president issued this warning, and Washington is still spiraling towards another 11th-hour spending battle. We can see it clear as day, but many career politicians cannot.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://www.etypeservices.com/Jena%20TimesID339/

Mon
21
May

Who turned off the lights?

 By Stephen Moore:

Is anyone paying attention to the crisis that is going on in our electric power markets? Over the past six months, at least four major nuclear power plants have been slated for shutdown, including the last one in operation in California. Meanwhile, dozens of coal plants have been shuttered as well -- despite low prices and cleaner coal. Some of our major coal companies may go into bankruptcy. This is a dangerous game we are playing with our most valuable resource outside of clean air and water.

 

Traditionally, we’ve received almost half our electric power nationwide from coal and nuclear power, and for good reason. They are cheap, highly resilient and reliable. The disruption to coal and nuclear power wouldn’t be disturbing if this were happening as a result of market forces. That’s only partially the case.

 

Mon
21
May

The outrageous outsider

 By Terry Paulson:

 

I don’t think those who voted for President Donald Trump knew what they were actually getting when he won. They were tired of the polarized inaction out of Washington. They recoiled at the prospect of Hillary Clinton, tainted by her questionable decisions and the prospect 0of another eight years of liberal overreach.

 

They surprised the pundits and voted for a man with plenty of opinions and no political experience. They elected what might accurately be described as an “outrageous outsider.” Many complain about his impulsive tweets. He brags too much. Instead of political decorum, he calls his political adversaries names, from “Rocket Man” and “Pocahontas.” But no matter what you feel about this president, you have to admit that he gets things done. This president actually delivers on his campaign promises.

 

Mon
14
May

Liberalism must be destroyed

By Derek Hunter

If you thought conservatives could “make nice” with liberals, that “both sides have the country’s best interest at heart,” you were wrong. This week more of the con-jobs and character assassinations the political left is attempting have been exposed, and if it doesn’t make you realize the Liberal Industrial Complex will stop at nothing to protect itself and destroy the Trump administration, nothing will. The economic news was all good this week, though you’d barely know it if you watched cable news.

Mon
14
May

The tenured enemy in our midst

By Mike Adams:

In 2007, I sat down for a brief interview with an FBI agent. While we sat in a coffee shop in Wilmington, North Carolina, I outlined the case against Professor Julio Pino of Kent State University. My accusations were serious but irrefutable: Julio Pino was an Islamic jihadist who was actively conspiring with other terrorists seeking to murder American troops and innocent civilians. The FBI eventually got Pino. Unfortunately, it took them eleven years during which Ohio taxpayers were forced to pay the salary of a man who was openly planning to wage war on his own country.

 

When Pino finally entered a guilty plea in federal court last month, the charge was one count of making false statements to the FBI during an investigation dating back to 2016. The investigation concerned social media correspondences with a Facebook friend who identified himself as J.E.

 

Mon
07
May

Why Democrats are terrified of Kanye

By balScott Morefield

Turns out, when you’re a famous musician with 28 million Twitter followers people are going to sit up and pay attention to what you tweet, regardless of the topic. So when rapper Kanye West, a man who got over 41,000 likes for tweeting the word “decentralize,” lit the social media world on fire last week with a series of tweets seeming to support President Trump, the world was quick to take notice. Is one of the most successful recording artists of our generation actually ‘waking up’ to the folly of liberalism?

Has Kanye actually been red-pilled? On the one hand, conservatives understandably but a little hypocritically took an altogether different approach with Kanye than the “shut up and sing” imploration they typically would take were such a celebrity spouting off the usual liberal nonsense.

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Mon
07
May

The vulgar goes mainstream

By Cal Thomas:

To be vulgar once earned societal disapproval, ostracism from polite company and -- in my grandmother’s era -- put a young person in danger of having his mouth washed out with soap. Today, vulgarities are now mainstream. People speaking in a way that “would make a sailor blush” are now on primetime television and words once frowned upon in polite society are now a part of what was once known as cordial conversation.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://www.etypeservices.com/Jena%20TimesID339/

 

 

Mon
30
Apr

Life isn’t fair, but it’s still good

By Sammy J. Franklin

My thanks to a faithful reader who sent me the following column, which was titled “Life isn’t fair”!

It is reportedly written by 90-year-old Regina Brett of the Plain Dealer in Cleveland, Ohio.

The writer stated, “to celebrate growing older, I once wrote the 45 lessons life taught me. It is the most requested column I’ve ever written.”

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://www.etypeservices.com/Jena%20TimesID339/

Mon
23
Apr

Tariffs - No, but give me a solution

By  Bruce Bialosky

 

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